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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 9:52 pm 
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This lodge is approx. 12 ft. in diameter, 6 ft. off of the waters surface and built on an undermined bank of a creek. The roof is approx. 1 ft. thick and the inner living compartment is approx. 1.5 ft. in height. The floor is approx. 4 ft. thick above the low water mark. The lodge has an entrance on either end and it would appear that at least one of the entrances splits into two under water. Giving the lodge at least three escape/entrance routes. At least that's how it appears.

1st. pic.............................A freshly completed and active Beaver's lodge (Dec 2016)

2nd. pic............................After a Bear spent 1.5 minutes clawing into the top of it (Feb 2017)

3rd. pic............................The freshly completed repair job several days later.

4th. pic.............................The now old abandoned and slightly flattened lodge freshly clawed open by a Bear. The hole is approx. 2 ft. in diameter (Mar 2019)

5th. pic.............................Looking at the top of the lodge after Bear opened it up.

6th. pic.............................A closer look at the opening.

7th., 8th & 9th. pic.............Inside views of the lodge.

10th. pic...........................One of two inside entrances of the lodge.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:03 pm 
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Enjoyed the photos. Amazing how quickly the bears can get into a lodge, I often forget how powerful they are. Any idea if the bear got the beaver(s) or is the beaver just moved on?

I've been in a few lodges and found they are always sealed extremely well for thermal changes. Lots of moisture inside too, usually mushrooms growing. I wonder if another beaver will come by and patch things up and setup shop or build another lodge in the same area.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:28 pm 
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greengrass wrote:
Enjoyed the photos. Amazing how quickly the bears can get into a lodge, I often forget how powerful they are. Any idea if the bear got the beaver(s) or is the beaver just moved on?

I've been in a few lodges and found they are always sealed extremely well for thermal changes. Lots of moisture inside too, usually mushrooms growing. I wonder if another beaver will come by and patch things up and setup shop or build another lodge in the same area.

The first time the Bear ripped into it he only spent just over a minute and gave up. Never did expose the insides of it though. The Beavers patched it up but eventually moved out or at least we all assumed that. The land owners and myself saw no signs of them anywhere in the area. No fresh cut trees, branches............nothing. So we all thought that it was abandoned at that point. Yet for reasons only known to the Bear. He felt the need to expend a lot of energy to fully excavate the lodge in search of something. No signs of hair, blood though. Then yesterday I get a video of two Beavers in the same frame. So I'm guessing that he was not successful. Was the lodge in fact occupied or was it the scent of them still detectable inside the lodge. I suppose if the lodge gets rebuilt then I'll have my answer.

They use a lot of mud and grass in between the sticks. I guess that's the only way to keep the water from rising up inside the lodge. This year we had a tremendously high fast flowing creek here. This lodge would have been 3/4 covered with water during the peak of the flooding. Yet inside the lodge you can clearly see dry grass lining the insides of the living quarters. I find this discovery really fascinating to say the least.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 5:39 am 
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For a couple of years I'd been keeping an eye on a beaver lodge that was on the edge of a pond that had been created by beavers blocking a road culvert. After several years the beavers abandoned that lodge and built one against the road embankment near the blocked culvert. That lodge was destroyed by a backhoe (quicker and easier than a bear) and the beavers moved back to the old lodge, repairing and enlarging it.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:10 am 
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Woody Meristem wrote:
For a couple of years I'd been keeping an eye on a beaver lodge that was on the edge of a pond that had been created by beavers blocking a road culvert. After several years the beavers abandoned that lodge and built one against the road embankment near the blocked culvert. That lodge was destroyed by a backhoe (quicker and easier than a bear) and the beavers moved back to the old lodge, repairing and enlarging it.

Thanks Woody, that's interesting. From what I can gather, the Beaver are most active, building and repairing lodges and dams, felling trees and gathering food wood in the Spring and Autumn. Does that sound about right based on what you guys know?

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 9:37 am 
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Here in northcentral Pennsylvania most of the beaver ponds freeze over in the depth of winter so the beavers aren't very active as long as they have enough food in their feedbed. They make the feedbed in the fall by sicking cut branches and limbs in the pond bottom near their lodge. If they didn't store enough they have to work on frozen trees in the winter and expose themselves to coyotes and bobcats with limited access to the water.

I've seen beaver build a new dam in the winter, but that's got to be very unusual. They usually make major repairs to the dam and lodge in the spring and and continue adding to them in summer and fall. Here, they feed primarily on herbaceous vegetation in late spring, summer and early fall. Most colonies eventually cut all the preferred trees (aspen and willow) then work on secondary species (maple, beech and black cherry) and then move on, abandoning the pond and lodge. It's only in a few places that there's enough of their preferred tree species that a colony lasts for many years -- One 40-acre lake where I spent a lot of time as a kid/teenager/young man had an active beaver colony for at least 20 years. Those beaver ate spadderdock in spring, summer and fall and perhaps beneath the ice in winter but did make a feedbed in the fall for a winter food supply.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 10:33 am 
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Woody Meristem wrote:
Here in northcentral Pennsylvania most of the beaver ponds freeze over in the depth of winter so the beavers aren't very active as long as they have enough food in their feedbed. They make the feedbed in the fall by sicking cut branches and limbs in the pond bottom near their lodge. If they didn't store enough they have to work on frozen trees in the winter and expose themselves to coyotes and bobcats with limited access to the water.

I've seen beaver build a new dam in the winter, but that's got to be very unusual. They usually make major repairs to the dam and lodge in the spring and and continue adding to them in summer and fall. Here, they feed primarily on herbaceous vegetation in late spring, summer and early fall. Most colonies eventually cut all the preferred trees (aspen and willow) then work on secondary species (maple, beech and black cherry) and then move on, abandoning the pond and lodge. It's only in a few places that there's enough of their preferred tree species that a colony lasts for many years -- One 40-acre lake where I spent a lot of time as a kid/teenager/young man had an active beaver colony for at least 20 years. Those beaver ate spadderdock in spring, summer and fall and perhaps beneath the ice in winter but did make a feedbed in the fall for a winter food supply.

I have lots to learn about the Beaver. In fact most folks here on the Island have no idea that Beaver live here....really! Thanks for the info, much appreciated.

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PostPosted: Wed Mar 27, 2019 4:44 am 
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westcocanuck2 wrote:
Woody Meristem wrote:
Here in northcentral Pennsylvania most of the beaver ponds freeze over in the depth of winter so the beavers aren't very active as long as they have enough food in their feedbed. They make the feedbed in the fall by sicking cut branches and limbs in the pond bottom near their lodge. If they didn't store enough they have to work on frozen trees in the winter and expose themselves to coyotes and bobcats with limited access to the water.

I've seen beaver build a new dam in the winter, but that's got to be very unusual. They usually make major repairs to the dam and lodge in the spring and and continue adding to them in summer and fall. Here, they feed primarily on herbaceous vegetation in late spring, summer and early fall. Most colonies eventually cut all the preferred trees (aspen and willow) then work on secondary species (maple, beech and black cherry) and then move on, abandoning the pond and lodge. It's only in a few places that there's enough of their preferred tree species that a colony lasts for many years -- One 40-acre lake where I spent a lot of time as a kid/teenager/young man had an active beaver colony for at least 20 years. Those beaver ate spadderdock in spring, summer and fall and perhaps beneath the ice in winter but did make a feedbed in the fall for a winter food supply.

I have lots to learn about the Beaver. In fact most folks here on the Island have no idea that Beaver live here....really! Thanks for the info, much appreciated.


I haven't seen any around here for a while :rofll

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 10:09 am 
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Great post and pictures. You're getting us fired up again.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 29, 2019 7:50 pm 
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cameratrapcodger wrote:
Great post and pictures. You're getting us fired up again.

You see, this is where one of those GoPro's on a stick would be some use to me here.

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