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 Post subject: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:23 pm 
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So, I just saw an example on youtube for camera setting , shooting wildlife. The guy said setting the camera to Aperture works very well for this, and he had one example of setting the camera to F5.6, 1.3, and an ISO of 100.

Can any of you guys tell me, is that a common ISO setting for shooting wildlife, or can you go more with that? and if so, I'm guessing that will make you change your F#, correct?


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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:33 pm 
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The definitive answer is "It depends". It depends on what type of setting you're in -- open field or deep, dark woods -- and whether you're more interested in depth of field or a sharp um-blurred image. In simple terms, the smaller the aperture (higher f-stop number) the greater the depth of field; the higher the shutter speed the less likely movement of the subject or camera shake will result in a blurred image; and the higher the ISO number, the more sensitive the camera is to low light but the photo will have more grain.

I tend not to be too concerned with the f-stop unless the subject is a wildflower and I want the background habitat to be sharp. Most of my photos are in the woods where low light levels are the rule so I usually keep the ISO at 400 or more (up to 6400 in deepest shade) in order for the shutter speed to be as high as possible. In an open field, at the beach or similar location in bright sun an ISO of 100 would probably be fine, but in deep shade with a subject likely to move such a low ISO would give you blurred photos.

It was cloudy here this morning when I headed for the woods and I left the camera on the "Program" setting -- the first photo was taken at 1/200 second, f-4, ISO 1000; then some in deep shade at 1/60 sec., f-5.6, ISO 1600; the last few at 1/400 sec,, f-5.6, ISO 3200. It's hard, but not impossible to hand hold a camera at 1/30 of a second, especially if you have an image stabilized lens. I usually change the ISO setting if the shutter speed drops below 1/60 second

Take your camera out and try it on all kinds of subjects, at all kinds of settings. Leaves or tall grass moving in a breeze both in the woods and in bright sun will give you an idea of what you'll get at different settings. Don't wait until a 10-point buck walks out in front of you to see the results of having the camera at the wrong setting.

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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 12:50 pm 
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Great stuff Woody.....

I'm just wondering if it wouldn't be easier for me, to just leave it on the automatic setting, that way I don't have to worry about not having the settings set correct when a deer comes walking under my stand. I will play with the settings though, I may use them for shooting other subjects, but i just wonder if I would be better off just leaving it on auto when I'm out hunting, and a smaller buck comes walking through, and I want to get a pic of it....


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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:03 pm 
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You can stick with Auto for now and make note on what the camera is choosing for settings. It's all abut reading the light for the conditions and subjects you are shooting. If I wanted to shoot action shots of flushing birds for exapmle, I would want to crank my shutter speed way up to freeze the action...but because a quicker shutter will let in less light then I would have to compensate by opening the aperture up to let as much light as possible in during the quick shutter. ISO will also control the exposure as well. The more you shoot the more you will learn.

I was where you are now 3 years ago, with handheld photography. just used full auto...but now my camera never comes out of manual mode.

Pred

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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:08 pm 
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interesting....

Do you guys have any examples or pics you can share, where you used auto, and then took another pic in manual mode? I'm just wondering if there is a huge difference in pic quality by using the manual mode. From what I have noticed, my cam in auto mode, seems to take great pics, that's why I'm wondering just how much better quality a guy can get in the manual mode?


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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:46 pm 
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A lot of times auto will do just fine, but in certain cases it just won't cut it. An extreme example would be taking a photo of a sunset. in manual you can adjust shutter until you get the look/exposure you want. in manual it will often be under exposed or over exposed.

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 Post subject: Re: Aperture setting?
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 3:16 pm 
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Predator 1 wrote:
A lot of times auto will do just fine, but in certain cases it just won't cut it. An extreme example would be taking a photo of a sunset. in manual you can adjust shutter until you get the look/exposure you want. in manual it will often be under exposed or over exposed.


yes, that makes sense..... and I could see where it could come in handy if it's starting to get dark outside, and you need more light for a pic, but don't want the flash to go off. I'll have to play with it a bit....

Pred.... do you have to set your DSLR's in your cam traps, to manual mode to capture your images, or do you use an auto mode for those?


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