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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 8:44 am 
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Fledgling
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Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2016 10:45 am
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A while back I posted a couple of guides about using / converting Yongnuo RF-603ii for trapping purposes. One of these described building a battery eliminator to give greater battery capacity and run time:
viewtopic.php?f=113&t=11506&start=20

The second was about converting one of these transmitters to work from an IR trigger unit:
viewtopic.php?f=113&t=11778

This one is a short note about how to build and convert AA battery holders to supply these little transmitters for more than a couple of days (the duration that the normal 2xAAA internal batteries last). My target was for a good couple of weeks in low temperatures (i.e. sub zero deg C) and I'd worked out that 6 AAs could comfortably do that. In normal summer weather they will last 3+ weeks.

I'd been hunting around for a while for a holder that would hold 6 AAs but supply at 3V. All the commercially available cheap plastic clip in holders are wired in series so supply 6x1.5V. That's 9V and not something you want to pump into an electronics device that runs at 3V. Instead we want to use that capacity at lower voltage to give good extended running.

I started by taking a regular 6 cell AA battery holder and done some modifying on that to give effectively 3 x 2 pairs of cells. Each pair is wired in series (1.5V x 2 = 3V) and the 3 pairs are then joined in parallel to give the extra capacity. Unfortunately, taking this route is quite fiddly because it requires cutting some of the existing wires and then some re-soldering to get the new configuration. Not to bad in itself but the holder is polythene and melts very easily. I'm a pretty able solderer but I just found it too much bother after doing a couple of these. Instead I found an easier way as shown below.

We start with 2 cell AA holders (you will need three of these). The particular model is one that holds the cells 'back to back' rather than 'side by side' (the more common style). Get holders with leads pre attached. See the type below.

Attachment:
D7200 -181205-88782.jpg


You will also need one lead (shown below) four thin cable ties, double sided tape, some insulation tape and soldering ability (last is optional).

Attachment:
D7200 -181205-88787.jpg


We are going to put this lot together to make one of these:

Attachment:
D7200 -181205-88789.jpg


Assembly is straightforward:
1) Grab the 3 holders and with some double sided tape, stick them together with the leads in the same orientation.
2) Use 4 thin cable ties joined together to make a square and put this around the middle of the block. adjust so that the little lock on the end of each tie is at a corner. Cinch tight and cut off the spare ends. This creates a nice strong block of 3 x 2 holders.
3) Now join up all the same coloured leads (red with red , black with black). Arrange wires as suits your need (here I wanted them quite short and leading to one side to fit in a particular enclosure). This is wiring each pair in parallel. Wire in the connector lead with the terminals. Optionally but best if you can, solder each group of wires together then insulate with Tape.

VERY IMPORTANT NOTE... If you are going to connect this terminal block to another terminal lead that is then attached to your equipment (e.g. as I have done with the battery eliminators for the Yongnuo units) you must get the polarity right when connecting the leads to the terminal. You will see in the picture below that the black wire on the lead is fixed to the red wire bunch from the holders. Similar for the red lead wire going to the black bunch. Once this is attached to another terminal clip, the positive will end up back on the red lead. If you are in any doubt here, check with a multimeter!

Attachment:
D7200 -181205-88792.jpg


That's it. It is much easier than trying to reconfigure the 6 cell holder without melting it.

Final result. 6AA battery pack driving a Yongnuo RF-603ii that controls a Nikon SB28. A cover fits over the top to protect that lot and it all fits in quire a small box so is inobtrusive. This setup will run for a couple of weeks reliably before the transmitter flattens them. I've never had any need for extra power for the flash unit as these SB28's are very frugal.

Attachment:
D7200 -181205-88795.jpg


Hope that helps.

If you want more capacity you could add another pair or two of holders to the bundle.

Final tip.
1) Try to ensure you replace all the batteries in a holder together, use the same capacity / type together and charge them to the same state at the same time. This will reduce any problems with unmatched cells.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:50 pm 
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Fledgling
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Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2018 3:35 pm
Posts: 69
Location: Uk
Thanks Richard


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