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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 10:44 am 
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Location: Magalia, California
Here's a piece with video about a recent find of mountain lion kittens in the Napa-Sonoma wine country north of SF Bay. KInd of neat finding the "den", but would have been interesting to learn a little more about it (dense brush, cave, recess).

A few years ago some local yokel found kittens not too far from where I live. He took them. Can;t remember if he tried to sell them or posted it in Facebook, but he wasn't pleased with the unintended legal consequences.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 9:27 pm 
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Well isn't that a rare and beautiful sight. This story has me asking some questions that would be good to know the answers to, maybe you might know?

How long does it take for a female lion to go into heat once her young has left her permently? I was filming a female lion once and found that her young had left her at around 14 - 16 months of age. Soon afterward, I was filming her at some sets that I have never filmed her at before. Both of those sets were set up at male scratch piles. It appeared that she was in search of him once again. Does the maternal drive to reproduce kick in once separation occurs?

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2017 10:49 pm 
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Location: Central Saskatchewan, Canada
Very interesting...


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 12:49 am 
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Cool story.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:02 pm 
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Gary, estrous cycling kicks in when lactation is over and the kids are weaned. This is called "lactation anestrus" because the hormones that maintain lactation also inhibit the estrous cycle. Females then cycle until they become pregnant; they are NOT seasonal breeders. This is different from lynx and bobcats which ARE seasonal breeders and cycle only a few months of the year.

At the other extreme, females of other species like the weasels and martens go into heat shortly after giving birth. This is called a post-partum estrus. They can be pregnant while lactating, but the embryos remain in "suspended animation" so to speak until they implant in the uterine wall several months later. The embryos start to develop upon implanting. This is called delayed implantation, which is also a trait of all bears (except the sun bear of SE Asia).

If this seems long-winded its because I teach this stuff each summer.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 12, 2017 9:33 pm 
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cameratrapcodger wrote:
Gary, estrous cycling kicks in when lactation is over and the kids are weaned. This is called "lactation anestrus" because the hormones that maintain lactation also inhibit the estrous cycle. Females then cycle until they become pregnant; they are NOT seasonal breeders. This is different from lynx and bobcats which ARE seasonal breeders and cycle only a few months of the year.

At the other extreme, females of other species like the weasels and martens go into heat shortly after giving birth. This is called a post-partum estrus. They can be pregnant while lactating, but the embryos remain in "suspended animation" so to speak until they implant in the uterine wall several months later. The embryos start to develop upon implanting. This is called delayed implantation, which is also a trait of all bears (except the sun bear of SE Asia).

If this seems long-winded its because I teach this stuff each summer.

Ya I knew that they are not seasonal breeders but the rest of this is all new to me and it's fascinating. Now I know, thank you.

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