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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 6:03 pm 
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This little film may be of interest, since most of us probably enjoy nature documentaries.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 7:38 pm 
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Good video Codger. I've yet to find the exact point where artistic license ends and nature faking begins -- although, as Justice Kennedy said in another context, I know it when I see it.

Brings to mind this question in regard to camera traps -- is it ethical to use a bait or lure to attract wildlife in front of our cameras? How about using beaver castoreum? or moving the carcass of a roadkill? how about putting a camera at a found carcass without moving it? I've done all three without any qualms, but others may say the first two are unethical but the third is OK.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 9:17 pm 
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Woody, ya wanna read my chapter on ethics? :jumpy -- just kidding.

Many camtrappers use those methods, and there's no secret about it. There's nothing biologically unnatural about many of the little tricks camtrappers use to get photos. Animals encounter strange scents and scavenge dead carcasses. However, when a film shows some unusual aspect of animal behavior, it raises questions, like "How in the 'hail' did they get the animal to do that?"). That's when it's important to disclose one's methods. Once disclosed, viewers can decide for themselves whether the methods violate their own code of ethics. Using live bait, tethered and unable to escape, is another matter. A lot of people and the dept of game would not approve, unless you're using minnows to fish.

And then there are questions of legality, where you have to extrapolate laws about hunting as they apply to camera trapping . Using bait for camera trapping is illegal in California unless you have a "scientific collector's permit". Using recorded animal calls is also illegal for hunting and camera trapping. Its okay for bird watching. Setting a camera at a found carcass probably is not illegal. Two issues that concern game commissions are "harassment" (and "take"), and actions that change the natural behavioral patterns of wild animals.

A really good book on the topic is Chris Palmer's "Shooting in the wild, an insider's account of making movies in the animal kingdom". (Amazon now lists this book and another book with a different title , both by Palmer. The second book looks similar, so it may just be a revised edition.)


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