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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 6:31 pm 
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For you mountain lion aficionados and naturalists, I am interested in your thoughts about the findings in this study --Meanwhile, I will hunt down the original article to get more of the details.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2019 9:31 pm 
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I find this study fascinating and the part of a Cougar fleeing it's kill when the sound of a human is heard. I find that surprising really and I'm curious to hear more about this study. I work with an organization https://coexcarnivores.org/ This research could be invaluable to us and well worth looking further into. I'm going to send your link to my friend after this.

Thanks Chris :awesome

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:46 am 
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Always simulating to read about wildlife research. I don't find the results surprising. I doubt that Mtn lions suddenly find themselves surrounded by human voices very often, though I am sure it happens around the SF Bay Area. Plus, all of these animals have had bad experiences with humans, chased by dogs, treed, darted, and fitted with collars, often more than once. I would like to know if they react differently to a single speaker with a feminine voice reading poetry. I wouldn't be surprised if they approached. The problem with this experiment is that you can't have a control group of animals that lack the bad human experiences. But its always good to read the original report rather than a journalist's take on it.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 1:13 pm 
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Interesting, but not surprising. I have no experience with mountain lions, but quite a bit with black bears. Here in Pennsylvania we have a lot of black bears that are quite habituated to humans and live in close proximity to humans. Some of them seem to be completely undisturbed by human activity -- those bears have, one way or another, come to associate humans with food. However, most of the bears in what I call the Big Woods do not associate humans with food. In one area where I've had cameras for over five years human use of the trails has markedly increased in that time. Although the black bear population has apparently increased, the number of bear photos on the cameras closest to a trail has markedly dropped as have photos of both bobcats and coyotes. Just anecdotal, take it for what it's worth (maybe nothing).

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 7:59 pm 
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We have a very high density of Cougars, apparently the most in the world per square mile but I honestly don't know how they would know that. I'm presently camera trapping 9 individual Cougars in 4 different areas, a personal best I might add. One is conditioned to humans and has a penchant for livestock. The others live where little human contact is the norm. The ones that do come into town get shot and end of story. No money here to radio collar and relocate....so sad. I think that most animals that hear human voices will want to actually see the source of that noise. It's only natural I do believe. The human voice would be more of a curiosity attraction rather than a deterrent I would think. We have had many people here on the Island that have been attacked by Cougars and far more approached by them while outdoors. If the human voice was recorded and the cat cannot see a human to associate it with. That may very well unsettle them and encourage them to leave the area. To actually force a cat off of a kill by the sounds of a human voice is very surprising, incredible really. That part of the study is most interesting I find.

:ding You know, I've always wanted to play rap music and the sound of my Mother's screaming voice over a loudspeaker. If their reaction would be anything like mine then they would scram.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:12 pm 
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westcocanuck2 wrote:
We have a very high density of Cougars, apparently the most in the world per square mile but I honestly don't know how they would know that. I'm presently camera trapping 9 individual Cougars in 4 different areas, a personal best I might add. One is conditioned to humans and has a penchant for livestock. The others live where little human contact is the norm. The ones that do come into town get shot and end of story. No money here to radio collar and relocate....so sad. I think that most animals that hear human voices will want to actually see the source of that noise. It's only natural I do believe. The human voice would be more of a curiosity attraction rather than a deterrent I would think. We have had many people here on the Island that have been attacked by Cougars and far more approached by them while outdoors. If the human voice was recorded and the cat cannot see a human to associate it with. That may very well unsettle them and encourage them to leave the area. To actually force a cat off of a kill by the sounds of a human voice is very surprising, incredible really. That part of the study is most interesting I find.

:ding You know, I've always wanted to play rap music and the sound of my Mother's screaming voice over a loudspeaker. If there reaction would be anything like mine then they would scram.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2019 8:39 pm 
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Interesting read ..


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 9:43 am 
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I have set up cameras on dozens of cougar kills in the last 20 plus years and have never had one stand its ground. In fact, I have only seen one at the kill site and it was a huge male. It too slunk away when I move in.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 1:35 pm 
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I worked on a cougar project putting cameras at kill sites and never once saw a cougar. You could tell the distance with a directional antenna and they were often 20-100ft away and not once did I see one. As soon as I was gone they reappeared. Occasionally you'd hear an accidental stick snap but that was it. Have had the some experience with every animal I've worked with.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:28 am 
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Quote:
I have set up cameras on dozens of cougar kills in the last 20 plus years and have never had one stand its ground.


This is what I have always heard. To some extent the Santa Cruz mountains, which is very close to Silicon Valley, is probably overrun with outdoor recreationists. The coastal black-tails are not big deer, and one meal of the haunches is quick and easy. More time and work to clean up the rest. An older field study in the Sierra Nevada also found that lions often take one huge meal and then move on, killing on average a deer a week. But I would guess an adult elk would be good for 2-3 days of meal, if no bears find it.


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