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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 7:39 am 
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I have been using the Freud Diablo Forstner drill bits for drilling and countersinking my plastic cases. The problem I'm having is that these bits have a solid outer rim and quickly build up heat by friction.

I'm wanting to know what other members here use for drilling and countersinking?
I'm also curious as to how others punch or drill out their adhesive backed foam padding?
Any tips, tricks and names of brands of tools that would make life easier in doing these things would be greatly appreciated by all of us reading this post.

Thanks,
Gary

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:55 am 
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On Forstner bits, I touch up the cutting edges with a Dremel grinder when they get dull, and drill at high speed, which seems to reduce the risk of grabbing. All the rim blade has to do is incise a circle, so perhaps your Forstner's transverse cutter is dull. A new chainsaw grinder in the Dremel works well to sharpen the transverse cutter on the Forstner. A light touch should do the job. You don't want the rim blade to be shorter than the transverse blade, so go lightly.

If you want to inset the glass circle on the inside of a Pelican case so that the case surface is flush with the glass, drill your 1/8th inch pilot hole first, then drill the incised seating for the glass using the larger, say 1" Forstner. Go very slowly and stop often to see that the cut is equal in depth around the edge. In my experience with Pelican cases, they tend to drill little unevenly under the pressure of the bit, so I stop frequently to inspect the cut and then rotate the case to make sure the cut is of equal depth. Test the glass circle in the incised cut. (It doesn't have to be exactly flush.) When you're happy with the cut, replace your 1" bit with a 7/8" bit. I drill the through-hole from the opposite side, but it is usually a wee bit off center but good enough for government work. Not sure that's what you were asking for, but it might help.

If you are countersinking holes for standoff screws, just use a commercial countersink and drill slowly.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 10:21 am 
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I use a set of master craft Canadian tire foresner bits for most of my holes. I do have a 1 in frued though that I use as well. I usually drill through the case with the 1 in but first then follow up after with the 1 1/4 to counter sink the glass.

I find it works well doing it this way because your 1 in hole has to be bang on its best to do that one first. The counter sink doesn't need to be bang on...I usually just eyeball it making sure the 1 1/4 will overlap fairly even surrounding the 1 in hole. I do the counter sink slow and gentle with the master craft 1 1/4 and it helps clean up any burs left over from drilling out your 1 in hole.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:22 pm 
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I'm finding the same problem with the Pelican cases in that they distort while I'm clamping or drilling them. I also turn them around to keep it flush in the hole cutting process. I use a cutting oil which really does work in keeping the bit cooler and reduce the friction. My cheap drill press has one speed and that's slow. I'm wondering about making a jig to frame in the case while drilling it out on the drill deck. Rather then clamping and distorting the case.

I'll have a look at them Mastercraft bits Jeremi. I agree with your technique on drilling the lens hole first and then the recess hole later. That way the countersinking procedure has less unnecessary plastic to remove that causes all of the associated problems right.

Would be nice to hear what others do here as well or what else they may have up their sleeve that hasn't already been mentioned.

Any ideas on how to effectively cut out holes in that adhesive backed foam?????

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:38 pm 
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Gary,
I haven't tried it for myself but think you could get a piece of thin walled copper pipe or similar material that is the correct diameter and sharpen the edge by filing or perhaps sanding. That should make a nice little cutting tool that you could use. Place the foam on a piece of wood, position the cutter where needed and tap with another block of wood or lightly tap with a hammer to cut through the foam and backing. You may also be able to simply push down and twist it into the foam to make the cut. Just a thought.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 8:30 pm 
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bigbassmann wrote:
Gary,
I haven't tried it for myself but think you could get a piece of thin walled copper pipe or similar material that is the correct diameter and sharpen the edge by filing or perhaps sanding. That should make a nice little cutting tool that you could use. Place the foam on a piece of wood, position the cutter where needed and tap with another block of wood or lightly tap with a hammer to cut through the foam and backing. You may also be able to simply push down and twist it into the foam to make the cut. Just a thought.

Thanks Ralph, that's not a bad idea.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 3:57 pm 
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I've never bothered to countersink the holes for the glass. At first I put the lens glass on the inside of the Pelican, now I prefer it on the outside (unless it's in a snorkel) which tends to keep rain and snow from accumulating and messing up the photos.

For the flashes, I now cut a piece of thin colorless glass to a rectangular shape most appropriate to the shape of the flash.

I chill (or freeze) the foam in the refrigerator to stiffen it up and then cut it with an X-acto knife; not the neatest way to do it, but "good enough for who it's fer".

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 7:44 pm 
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This is how I make my 1" holes in the adhesive backed foam. Sharpen up one end of a short section of copper pipe. Works great! No drilling required. A good tap with the 2# hammer and bingo, perfect cut circle.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 16, 2015 8:22 am 
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Excellent ideas fellas, I had forgotten about this post. I'm putting some of that foam in the freezer and going down to the hardware store today.

Thanks,

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