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 Post subject: The bears' rubbing tree
PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 9:53 am 
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Location: Magalia, California
Here's my first video for the year, fresh from the camera.
I'm learning a lot at this location, and have two other cameras nearby.


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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 10:47 am 
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You really have a nack with your narration, great clip. Those Bears are enormous too....yikes.
Hey, do you suppose the first Bear was doing that territorial dominance thing of foot stomping? I will often find these foot stomp marks leading off the path to a Bear tree and then continuing on to the path once again. I'm finding fresh ones on every outing these days in all locations where Bears live. I see a lot of foot stomping marks and fresh signs of rubbing, clawing and biting of trees during the early Spring. Perhaps it has to do with the arrival of mating season for the Bears.

I find many old Bear trees along the side of paths and dusty old roads. All it takes is one Bear to rub and bite it to start the ball rolling. I've even had a Wolfpack come by this one favourite tree that many Bears have savaged over the years. The scent of many Bears was strong as was the visual bite and claw marks. I suppose that the Wolves took great interest in this tree because they had 3 cubs with them. Looking up high to the bite marks, cowering and giving a wide berth as they maintained eye contact as they swerved around it. The 3 cubs also displayed the body language showing a great deal of apprehension, timidness when gazing up at the bite marks. I even had a large Wolf, no doubt one of the alphas. Look up and sniff intently, turn tail and urinate at the base. Then turn to face the tree, sniff and then roll in it's urine in earnest. That tree garnered a great deal of respect from the Wolves. Bear trees are one of my favourite places to set up a camera.

I look forward to seeing more of your video clips.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 11:34 am 
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Thanks Gary, that's great information and adventure. I am not familiar with the foot stomping, but will see what I can find out about it. I have two other rubbing trees under cam traps right now. I've some hysterical footage of overzealous cubs rubbing their butts off (literally), but the lighting was far from ideal. I'm waiting for a repeat performance.


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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 1:29 pm 
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Wow... that was really well done and interesting to watch. Neat!

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 7:47 pm 
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That was really special...I enjoyed the sh-- out of that! Great job!!


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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 7:58 pm 
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Beautiful animals -- the size of those bears is pretty impressive. One of my camera traps caught a bear rubbing on the same tree on two consecutive years, but only once each year even though the camera was there continuously. In the ensuing five years no bear has rubbed on that tree -- a camera's sill at the same set and it gets a lot of photos of bears, but no rubbing.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 8:12 pm 
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cameratrapcodger wrote:
Thanks Gary, that's great information and adventure. I am not familiar with the foot stomping, but will see what I can find out about it. I have two other rubbing trees under cam traps right now. I've some hysterical footage of overzealous cubs rubbing their butts off (literally), but the lighting was far from ideal. I'm waiting for a repeat performance.

I've sent you a PM of some pics showing you what foot stomps look like. You have no doubt seen them, particularly during the breeding season. You will notice your first Bear placing his rear paw into the same place that his front paw stepped. Although I have only stills of Bears doing this but I really think that your Bear it foot stomping. Next time up, have a look down and you may find depressions in the ground. You may have to remove some leaves to find them. BTW, I've also included a copy of a journal that explains a bit more about it.

For anybody else that's interested in what they look like, here is an example.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 8:44 pm 
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Thanks for the feedback, guys.
Gary. I know what you are talking about. I have footage of several old bears stomping around, and I'll be keeping an eye out for it. (My PM answer covers some other things). Regarding Woody;s remark about rarely used rubbing trees -- it seems that tree pitch stimulates the rubbing. Scratching and gnawing is part of the warm-up but also continues through the bout, at least when they are really going at it. I'll put together some more footage -- some are highly amusing.


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PostPosted: Wed May 09, 2018 9:47 pm 
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Pretty cool footage. The narrative sure adds to it. I am learning some new things about bears. Videos are fun, hey Chris .. can’t wait to see some more ..


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PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 4:24 am 
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Quote:
it seems that tree pitch stimulates the rubbing

Agreed; here where conifers are generally only a minor component of the forest a disproportional number of bear rubbing trees are conifers. The same is true of buck rubs, if there's a small conifer the bucks will rub on it rather than the deciduous trees of the same diameter. Probably a way for both bears and deer to acquire a "perfume" similar to scent rolling in canines.

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