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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2018 2:29 pm 
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Fledgling
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Any suggestions on how to mount the pelican cases? Atm I have a tripod but when I take this into the jungle of Peru I will need something adjustable and sturdy like a tripod but I think that a tripod will just get wrecked. Any suggestions on something sturdy that could be moved fairly easily as I won’t have tonnes of tools


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2018 4:21 pm 
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A lot of members here use a "pipethrough". This is a very simple and practical method. Some of my builds have a small ubolts on either side to enable you to attach a cable, chain rope or whatever. If you put the ubolts on the lid you can open and close the case without removing the cam from the tree. If you put the ubolts in the body of the case and use a chain and lock it cannot be opened or removed. Hope this helps.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2018 7:48 pm 
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I mount some of my cameras on what is called a "concrete stake": a solid steel rod about 1/2 -5/8 inch in diameter with a series of holes drilled through. The stakes come in various lengths and are very inexpensive -- and sturdy. I drive them into the ground with a hammer (or rock) and the holes allow me to adjust the height of the camera.

Almost all my cameras are in steel security boxes that are easily bolted to the concrete stake and allow easy removal of the camera and re-installation in the same position. Here's how I do the boxes -- viewtopic.php?f=9&t=10052&p=81871&hilit=security+box&sid=200d7f6886495188b84268c38603d83c#p81871

And a photo of a camera mounted low on a stake --


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 10, 2018 7:43 pm 
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I also mount all of my Pelican cases in steel Bear boxes and then bolt them to trees using stainless steel lag screws.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:15 pm 
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The "pipe through" solution works well, provided that your builds were laid out with enough space to accommodate the pipe. The older solution was U-bolts or eye-bolts-- one on either side of the case. Either way, you can use a cable lock, nylon cord or even rope to cinch the camera to a tree trunk. Attaching them to smaller saplings or stakes is a little problematic using these methods, but a cross piece of wood lashed to the stake will stabilize the rig, and then you can lash the eye bolts or the pipe-through cord to the cross piece. A third option is interlocking camera case mounts. You have to screw one piece into the tree; it slides into the piece on the camera case. Fourth optio (my favorite) is Ram mounts -- pricey but easy to use, and they give you a lot of freedom in aiming the camera or flood lights. They consist of 2 ball mounts (one for the cam back, the other for the tree) and an adjustable connector with sockets at either end. I might also mention that indigenous people are excellent at solving these problems with machetes and local materials, even vines, though we tend to shy away from such methods.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 11:09 am 
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cameratrapcodger wrote:
The "pipe through" solution works well, provided that your builds were laid out with enough space to accommodate the pipe. The older solution was U-bolts or eye-bolts-- one on either side of the case. Either way, you can use a cable lock, nylon cord or even rope to cinch the camera to a tree trunk. Attaching them to smaller saplings or stakes is a little problematic using these methods, but a cross piece of wood lashed to the stake will stabilize the rig, and then you can lash the eye bolts or the pipe-through cord to the cross piece. A third option is interlocking camera case mounts. You have to screw one piece into the tree; it slides into the piece on the camera case. Fourth optio (my favorite) is Ram mounts -- pricey but easy to use, and they give you a lot of freedom in aiming the camera or flood lights. They consist of 2 ball mounts (one for the cam back, the other for the tree) and an adjustable connector with sockets at either end. I might also mention that indigenous people are excellent at solving these problems with machetes and local materials, even vines, though we tend to shy away from such methods.


Yeah I was thinking of making it using materials and a machete but it needs to be sturdy. I like the ideas but i like to be able to have the back of the peli case open so i can see where im shooting and get all the focusing etc sorted so that the last thing i do is shut the case and its ready to go. Ill probably go with an old tripod as it will be sturdy and will hopefully not get knocked over by any large mammals that try to brush up against it or as some do lick the camera cases.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:24 pm 
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Don't give up yet unless you are using only one or 2 cameras. The pipe-through design WILL allow you to open the back and see the LCD viewfinder. Use a concrete stake (probably unavailable down there), conduit, 1 inch pipe or a stout wooden post. Drill the post or stake to receive a 5/16 or 3/8th inch threaded rod long enough to fit through the pipe with an inch to spare. Bolt the rod to the post (a nut on either side), then slide the rod through the Pelican case's pipe, and tighten it down with a wingnut and a lock washer. With the stake in the ground, you can now tilt the camera on the rod to frame your photo, and just tighten the nut to hold it in place. You can also rotate the post to adjust the view in the horizontal plane. The main shortcoming with this mounting system is the round pipe, conduit, or concrete stake which sometimes allows the camera to rotate a bit because it is off center on the post. Here in the states you can fix this by screwing a flat steel flange to the base of the post. Using a rock or rubber mallet to compress the soil around the stake also anchors it more firmly. Another solution is to use a 1 foot length of 1.5 o 2" PVC for the threaded rod mount. Cut a stake from a sapling, taper a square point with machete on one end, and whittle the upper end to receive the PVC pipe tightly (i'e., twist it on). Pound the stake into the soil with the rubber mallet; then twist on the PVC pipe and attach the camera. Pounding with a rock will flare the end of the stake and make it hard to fit the PVC pipe. This mount works very well, and they even stand up to curious black bears that test their strength against the post. The only tools needed are a rubber mallet, pruning saw, and machete or small ax. You have to prepare your "PVC stake adaptor" with the threaded rod in the shop. (I have assumed you are using point & shoot homebrews. If you are using DSLRs, the tripod (or tripod head mounted on a stake) is the easiest way to go).


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:36 am 
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cameratrapcodger wrote:
Don't give up yet unless you are using only one or 2 cameras. The pipe-through design WILL allow you to open the back and see the LCD viewfinder. Use a concrete stake (probably unavailable down there), conduit, 1 inch pipe or a stout wooden post. Drill the post or stake to receive a 5/16 or 3/8th inch threaded rod long enough to fit through the pipe with an inch to spare. Bolt the rod to the post (a nut on either side), then slide the rod through the Pelican case's pipe, and tighten it down with a wingnut and a lock washer. With the stake in the ground, you can now tilt the camera on the rod to frame your photo, and just tighten the nut to hold it in place. You can also rotate the post to adjust the view in the horizontal plane. The main shortcoming with this mounting system is the round pipe, conduit, or concrete stake which sometimes allows the camera to rotate a bit because it is off center on the post. Here in the states you can fix this by screwing a flat steel flange to the base of the post. Using a rock or rubber mallet to compress the soil around the stake also anchors it more firmly. Another solution is to use a 1 foot length of 1.5 o 2" PVC for the threaded rod mount. Cut a stake from a sapling, taper a square point with machete on one end, and whittle the upper end to receive the PVC pipe tightly (i'e., twist it on). Pound the stake into the soil with the rubber mallet; then twist on the PVC pipe and attach the camera. Pounding with a rock will flare the end of the stake and make it hard to fit the PVC pipe. This mount works very well, and they even stand up to curious black bears that test their strength against the post. The only tools needed are a rubber mallet, pruning saw, and machete or small ax. You have to prepare your "PVC stake adaptor" with the threaded rod in the shop. (I have assumed you are using point & shoot homebrews. If you are using DSLRs, the tripod (or tripod head mounted on a stake) is the easiest way to go).


yeah I have a nikon D3200 with an sb28 and sb26 so i think a tripod is going to be the best option thanks for the info guys tho appreciate it !


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